Wednesday, November 20, 2013

#BookReview : Sycamore Row (Jake Brigance #2) by John Grisham

On the jacket:


'Fight them, Mr Brigance. To the bitter end. We must prevail.'

Jake Brigance has never met Seth Hubbard, or indeed even heard of him, until the old man's suicide note names him attorney for his estate. The will is dynamite. Seth has left ninety per cent of his vast, secret fortune to his housemaid.

As the relatives contest the will, and unscrupulous lawyers hasten to benefit, Jake searches for answers to the many questions left by Seth Hubbard's death:

What made him write that last-minute will leaving everything to a poor black woman named Lettie Lang?

Why did he choose to kill himself on the desolate piece of land known as Sycamore Row?

And what was it that Seth and his brother witnessed as children that, in his words, 'no human should ever see'?

In the long-awaited successor to the novel that launched his phenomenal career, John Grisham brings us the powerful sequel to A Time to Kill. As filled with page-turning twists as it is with legal mastery, Sycamore Row proves beyond doubt that John Grisham is in a league of his own.

Review:

I have been a big, big fan of John Grisham since the time I was around 15. His books are the only place where for me, a courtroom is the most exciting place on the earth. However, of late, I was not able to connect with his books,with the Theodore Boon series. With Sycamore Row, my faith in one of my favourite authors just got restored.

Sycamore Row picks up from where The Time To Kill stopped. Most of us have read The Time To Kill quite long back, so it might be a good idea to brush up with what really happened in the book. I know, I needed to. The book begins three years after where ATtK stopped, with Jack Brigance. 

Seth Hubbard kills himself by hanging from a tree and leaves a hand written letter where he wants Jack to defend himself. He leaves a new will, this a hand-written one, where he negates all that was in his proper will which was made 3 years ago, and leaves most of his money to his housekeeper. 

The story takes a bit to develop, but slowly we have a fast past legal thriller in hand. If you are a Grisham fan, you are going to lap this book up and your faith in the author will be restored too. Mine was.

Rating: ****.5/5

[This review is for Hachette India. The opinions are strictly my own and not been written under any obligation.]



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