Thursday, November 7, 2013

#BookReview: If God Was a Banker by Ravi Subramanian

On the jacket:


Two young management graduates, with nothing similar in family backgrounds and temperament, join New York international bank on the same day and take entirely different routes to success. Both rise up the ranks at breakneck speed: the fast and aggressive Sundeep, who will stoop to anything to get ahead, and the mature and sensible Swami, with a high regard for good old ethics. The racy narrative set in the high pressute miliey of competitive banking carries the undercurrent of a clash of values, in the intermeshed realms of the personal and the profeesional.

Review:

This was Ravi Subramanian's first book, though it wasn't my first read amongst his books. I read Bankster and Bankerupt, and that's how I became a fan. So, I decided, I need to read his other books as well and realised, my husband had a copy of If God Was A Banker. Yes, I was surprised. Nevertheless, I picked it up one night last week, when sleep seemed elusive.

Having read booked which he has written after he has evolved as an author, If God Was A Banker does have traces and hints of being the first book penned by an author, but what is remarkable, is to see how brilliantly he had started off as a writer, from being a banker himself and kept on polishing his craft, one book at a time. You must have guessed by now, I am one of his big fans and I am happy, none of his books have disappointed me. Not even his very first book!

Very well-researched and tight-scripted, the book gives us a good view of the foreign banking system. Three guys, Sundeep, Swami and Aditya join a multi-national bank, right after B-school and soon become good friends. All three have different characteristics and plunge into the corporate worlds based on how what their values and upbringings are. Manipulations galore, the reader is taken with the characters, into a world of ups and downs of the corporate world. What happens, is known as the story unfolds.

Earlier in the review I said the book has traces which indicate it's an author's debut book. The reason of saying so is, despite the finesse in writing, character building etc, there is a mix of everything, to please a wide range of readers. There is a moral in the story, there are office politics - a lot of which is mucky, and there is also a good insight into the banking world.

Rating: ***.5/5

[This was a personal read.]

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