Saturday, August 10, 2013

Book Review: The Paperback Badshah : The Comical Journey of a 100 Rupee Author by Abhay Nagarajan


On the jacket:



‘In life…you can choose to become a specialist or a generalist. But in love, please don’t become a reluctant fundamentalist. Instead become a love scientist.’
-Raghu Balakrishnan

Raghu Balakrishnan is a laidback 25 year old, who quits his regular job as a financial advisor to focus single-mindedly on his dream of becoming a published author in India. He stays with his parents. They reluctantly tolerate his new found creative ‘nonsense’ as he works on his book, a love story, which he titles The Paperback Badshah. 
As time passes by, he realizes that writing the book is just one part of the dream.
How did one go about getting it published? 
What about the marketing and promotion?
What about reactions from the readers?
Would it open up the faucets of love in their hearts or would it irritate them, given the sheer absurdity of the plot?
Along the way, will Raghu also get lucky in matters of the heart?
Find out by joining him in his entertaining journey, as he chases his writing dream to eventually become a published ‘100 Rupee’ paperback author.

Review:

The Paperback Badshah is a fun account of a financial advisor who quits his fulltime career to pursue his dream of being a published author. What he writes about, is this journey and the book is titled The Paperback Badshah.


With a mix of Hindi in it's language, the writing is smooth and easy flowing. What was missing is a climax. There was no buildup to an event, to end the plot. The interesting bit are the dream sequences that the author has spun.

A very fun read when it comes to a budding author's struggle, the society's interference, discouragement and farces; the setbacks, the disappointments, the joys, the tears and the smiles - all in all a decent read.

Rating: ***.5/5

[This is a author request review. The opinions are strictly my own and not been written under any obligation.]


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