Thursday, August 22, 2013

Book Review: The Guardian Angels by Rohit Gore

On the jacket:


The Guardian Angels is the epic and tumultuous story of two star-crossed lovers who weren’t just soul-mates but were also each other’s protectors.

The fates of Adi Mehta and Radha Deodhar are deeply entwined when within days of their first rendezvous they save each other’s lives.

Despite their vast sociopolitical differences, they are drawn to an uncertain future fraught with contrasting ambitions, personas and ideologies.

. . . he is the son of a billionaire, she is the daughter of a socialist.
. . . he is quiet and unassuming, she is a firebrand and spirited.

However, the unexplained phenomena ties them forever – whenever they are in peril, they are each other’s only saviors.

Over the following two decades Adi and Radha live through hope and despair, joy and sadness, and try to decipher their relationship. As the truth of their bond is revealed, they must confront the true nature of love, and ultimately, their destinies.

Review:

The Guardian Angels is the story about best friends who love each other no end. The met as pre-teens in the oddest of circumstances and have been each others saviours when caught unaware in tight situations. Adi and Radha, one a son of a billionaire, another the daughter of a socialist - there is absolutely nothing common or similar between the two. Still, they click and become friends for life.

While the blurb sounded promising, I started reading The Guardian Angels with zero expectations. New age Indian authors do have the tendency to make love stories cheesy and over the top. But I was pleasantly surprised and left with a feeling of contentment, once I finished reading the book.

Good language, a tight plot and perfect characterisations - Gore has written The Guardian Angels with the ease of a seasoned writer. The only thing I found funny was the way Adi's house was described - a bit on the lines of the Ambani house in Colaba. Situations were not cliched and well thought of, unique in a way. I haven't read his other books as yet, but I think I want to now.

Rating: ****/5

The book was received as part of Reviewers Programme on The Tales Pensieve.

3 comments:

  1. Hmm, a non-cheesy Indian writer? That sounds interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi! my first time out here...first and foremost - great blog! I love it....
    I also read this book from TP and thoroughly enjoyed it..a very good book on this genre that I have read in a long time...

    SRS@ http://muddledup.wordpress.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! :-)

      I am also running a giveaway in the blog, hope to see your entry as well :-D

      Delete

#BookReview: Men Without Women by Haruki Murakami

On the jacket: 'I find writing novels a challenge, writing stories a joy. If writing novels is like planting a forest, then writin...