Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Book Review: My Life by Brett Lee with James Knight

On the jacket:

Brett Lee is known throughout the cricketing world as one of the fastest and most exciting pace bowlers to play the game. Intimidating while charming, decent yet ferocious, he is known for his quick–one liners as much as his gutsy bottom–order batting.  He has been recorded bowling at speeds of over 100 mph leaving batsmen with only a fraction of a second to react once the ball leaves his hand. He had his first official game of cricket at the age of nine. He quickly developed into a very talented player and progressed through the cricket ranks to be in a position where he gained selection for his state at the age of 21 and his country at 24. Brett has one of the best strike–rates in the world for this form of the game. His pace bowling combined with his ability as a hard hitting and determined tail end batsman make him a crowd favourite throughout Australia and the world.

Review:

I have recently started reading (auto)biographies, and am a novice in rating them actually. Instead of treating them as someone's real life stories, I usually treat them just as what they are, stories.

I follow cricket, but I am not a crazy fan. Brett Lee is someone people like me know not only for his master sportsmanship on the field, but also for his singing and drop-dead gorgeous looks! So, what's the story behind that gorgeous mind? With this thought, I picked up My Life.

The book is extensive and covers a lot of Lee's life, right from his childhood to his present day life. It's honest, engaging and quite witty. Lee has visited India more than 40 times and the book contains many excerpts of his experiences here. 

As a reader, it made no difference to me that I do not follow cricket like a regular fan does. All in all, as a book, it is an excellent, extensive read, the best part being the dashes of humour here and there.

My rating: *****/5

[This is review for Random House IndiaThe opinions are strictly my own and not been written under any obligation.]

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