Monday, November 26, 2012

Book Review: The Edge Of The Machete by Abhisar Sharma

On the jacket:

Goal: To eliminate Aamir Sherzai, the new whiz-kid in the Pakistan-wing of the Taliban. 

Means: A CIA operative Ed Gomez, on a mission to get even with Aamir Sherzai, responsible for the execution of his best buddy and fellow agent, Jason. 

Location: The Beast, somewhere in the Khyber, Pakistan. 

To eliminate Jasons killer, Gomez has to infiltrate a conglomeration of the most ferocious terror outfits in The Beast as Sarfaraz Khan. But as the boundaries between Gomez and Sarfaraz blur, the CIA agent must not only plunge headlong into the battle in the Khyber, but also wage a war within. Simultaneously, Indian journalist Rahul Sharma, kidnapped and held hostage within The Beast, must find a way back to the woman he loves. And British white Muslim, Shaun Marsh aka Shahid Khan, sucked into the gathering at the Khyber, must learn to exorcise the ghosts of the past. 

Most of all, all three must try to escape the edge of Aamir Sherzais machete. Will they get away unscathed? Or meet a fate similar to Jasons? Find out in this captivating thriller! 

Review:

When The Edge Of The Machete came up for review, I was intrigued. I had already heard good things about the book from a friend, and the synopsis seemed interesting. I googled the book and the author a bit, and decided I had to read the book. To tell you the truth, I haven't read Sharma's first book The Eye of the Predetor, and while I would have preferred to read it first, The Edge Of The Machete landed at my doorstep before it. 

If you have been reading my book review regularly, or you are aware of my reading habit, you would know how vary I am of reading new age Indian authors. One famous author has spoilt the image in my mind, and I had stopped reading Indian authors for a while. Recently, I have started reading them, I make sure they are not highly referred to by casual or new readers and I am trying to find my own set of favourite, 21st century, Indian authors. Of late, all authors I have read, have surprised me pleasantly. As did Abhisar Sharma.

On the other hand, I believe, journalists make very good authors. We are already trained in creating tight plots with precision! Sharma kept my belief intact.

The Edge Of The Machete is a page-turner. I will not get into the depth of the story, you can read the summary above, but it is a sure-shot hit! A book that opens with a crime being committed (here, a brutal murder of a CIA agent), has done half it's job of keeping me glued to it's pages. There have been times when I have been tempted to sneak a peak at the last pages, as the suspense was killing, but I held on to it patiently!

The plot in The Edge Of The Machete has been spun cleverly, not allowing the pace to slack at any point. The language is good, simple and correct. The editor in me keeps looking for editorial and/or proofreading errors in books I read, but The Edge Of The Machete definitely didn't show any signs of those either!

Sub-plots within the main plots have been treated well, and at no point did I, as a reader, lose track of the sequence of incidents in the story. The characters have been very well defined and fit in the plot with perfection, there is no faffing or repetition to fill pages. Probably the only trouble I had with reading this book was, the fonts are too small. As it is, I wear glasses, I had to strain my eyes. Maybe, that can be sorted in the next print?

Rating: ****/5
Book       The Edge of the Machete
Author    Abhisar Sharma
ISBN       9381626677
ISBN-139789381626672
Binding    Paperback
Publishing Date  2012
Publisher  Westland
Number of Pages 342
Language English

This review is a part of the Book Reviews Program of BlogAdda.com. Participate now to get free books! The opinions are strictly my own and not been written under any obligation.




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